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Rushing waters in arroyos caused multiple issues

Multiple crews are inspecting arroyos in the Albuquerque metro following Tuesday’s monsoon storms. The storm sent gushing water through channels damaging the infrastructure and prompting water rescues.The San Pedro Bridge is re-opening this afternoon, but portions of I-40 eastbound remain closed between San Mateo and Louisana.”The debris that was pushed against the pier was some debris that came from upstream. And so nothing fell from the bridge. It just got caught up on the pier. And that’s what was making the water rush up over the interstate, over the channel,” said Kim Gallegos with NMDOT.Some of the arroyos in the city are managed by Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority. They measure the amount of water in their arroyos by cubic feet per second.”We’re looking at approximately 6 to 8,000 cubic feet per second. We’re waiting for the final data on that one. So that would be about the 15th largest flow in the North diversion channel in its 50-year history,” said interim director Kevin Trautman. Albuquerque Fire Rescue called that type of force dangerous. “When there’s that amount of force in power, you’re not going to stand a chance and it’s going to result in a 911 and a rescue call out for us,” said Lt. Jason Fejer from AFR. Encouraging those to not underestimate the power of the water in the arroyos. “That being said that the window for rescue is very, very narrow. So the biggest thing to stress here is to keep people out of the arroyos anyway,” Fejer said. AFR rescued two people in the arroyos following Tuesday’s storm. All reported no serious injuries. “Please try to provide accurate information and where they were last seen. That way, we usually know where they’re going and everyone sets up downstream,” Fejer said.

Multiple crews are inspecting arroyos in the Albuquerque metro following Tuesday’s monsoon storms.

The storm sent gushing water through channels damaging the infrastructure and prompting water rescues.

The San Pedro Bridge is re-opening this afternoon, but portions of I-40 eastbound remain closed between San Mateo and Louisana.

“The debris that was pushed against the pier was some debris that came from upstream. And so nothing fell from the bridge. It just got caught up on the pier. And that’s what was making the water rush up over the interstate, over the channel,” said Kim Gallegos with NMDOT.

Some of the arroyos in the city are managed by Albuquerque Metropolitan Arroyo Flood Control Authority. They measure the amount of water in their arroyos by cubic feet per second.

“We’re looking at approximately 6 to 8,000 cubic feet per second. We’re waiting for the final data on that one. So that would be about the 15th largest flow in the North diversion channel in its 50-year history,” said interim director Kevin Trautman.

Albuquerque Fire Rescue called that type of force dangerous.

“When there’s that amount of force in power, you’re not going to stand a chance and it’s going to result in a 911 and a rescue call out for us,” said Lt. Jason Fejer from AFR.

Encouraging those to not underestimate the power of the water in the arroyos.

“That being said that the window for rescue is very, very narrow. So the biggest thing to stress here is to keep people out of the arroyos anyway,” Fejer said.

AFR rescued two people in the arroyos following Tuesday’s storm. All reported no serious injuries.

“Please try to provide accurate information and where they were last seen. That way, we usually know where they’re going and everyone sets up downstream,” Fejer said.

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