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HomeLocal NewsVeterans honor fallen soldiers, advocate for better veteran care

Veterans honor fallen soldiers, advocate for better veteran care

61 Medal of Honor recipients are all being honored for their service. However, one veteran, Jade James, says many of his fellow soldiers, veterans of Hispanic and Latino background being honored at the LULAC National Convention, did not get the care they needed. “They paved the way for us because we learned from them,” James said. “We learned how not to treat our veterans.” Rep. Melanie Stansbury says dating back to the Vietnam War, many soldiers got sick from burn pits or contaminated water and developed cancer or other diseases while serving. “It’s really important that all of our veterans know that if you served in the military and you were exposed to any kind of workplace hazard, you have the opportunity to get improved health care through the VA system,” Stansbury said.With the assistance of the PACT Act, Stansbury says it will address the lack of resources veterans are given. Whether it be mental or physical, veterans say it’s an issue that needs to be expanded.Armando Telles, who is also a veteran, said, “People made these choices for us to be afforded the benefits that we have here in the United States with our rights.”He also created this memorial and plans to work with Stansbury to expand benefits for veterans affected by toxins while serving. “Nationally, we have our history being whitewashed,” Telles said. “We have our history being changed. And so this exhibit is going to help preserve who we are as a hinted.”For the veterans, they say these men are heroes and hope more opportunities will be given to veterans. “They gave the ultimate sacrifice for not only you and me, but for this country and everyone else,” James said.It’s the care they say veterans like them deserve.

61 Medal of Honor recipients are all being honored for their service. However, one veteran, Jade James, says many of his fellow soldiers, veterans of Hispanic and Latino background being honored at the LULAC National Convention, did not get the care they needed.

“They paved the way for us because we learned from them,” James said. “We learned how not to treat our veterans.”

Rep. Melanie Stansbury says dating back to the Vietnam War, many soldiers got sick from burn pits or contaminated water and developed cancer or other diseases while serving.

“It’s really important that all of our veterans know that if you served in the military and you were exposed to any kind of workplace hazard, you have the opportunity to get improved health care through the VA system,” Stansbury said.

With the assistance of the PACT Act, Stansbury says it will address the lack of resources veterans are given. Whether it be mental or physical, veterans say it’s an issue that needs to be expanded.

Armando Telles, who is also a veteran, said, “People made these choices for us to be afforded the benefits that we have here in the United States with our rights.”

He also created this memorial and plans to work with Stansbury to expand benefits for veterans affected by toxins while serving.

“Nationally, we have our history being whitewashed,” Telles said. “We have our history being changed. And so this exhibit is going to help preserve who we are as a hinted.”

For the veterans, they say these men are heroes and hope more opportunities will be given to veterans.

“They gave the ultimate sacrifice for not only you and me, but for this country and everyone else,” James said.

It’s the care they say veterans like them deserve.

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