Tuesday, April 16, 2024
HomeLocal NewsChild prodigy taking part in ovarian cancer research in Maryland

Child prodigy taking part in ovarian cancer research in Maryland

A child prodigy is spending her summer researching ovarian cancer at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.It’s not unusual for college students to switch majors, but when it comes to Alena Analeigh, she’s anything but typical.”At first, I thought I was going to be an engineer because I was in love with NASA, like stars and rovers. But I took my first engineering class and it really didn’t go as planned. So, I switched over to biological sciences,” Alena said.The 14-year-old rising college senior graduated from high school at the age of 12.Alena is the youngest research intern in a special internship program designed to increase diversity in the field of biomedicine that is funded by the American Cancer Society. Eight students from colleges in Maryland and across the country were selected to take part in the 11-week program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center.”When you see people who look like you in the lab, you feel that you can participate, you feel that you have a place and you can contribute,” said Dr. Tonya Webb, an associate professor and assistant director for diversity, equity and inclusion at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.Alena’s work has focused on ovarian cancer. A student at Arizona State University, she’s considering going to the University of Maryland School of Medicine here for her Ph.D. in viral immunology.”To study viruses, travel around the world, and hopefully, do some vaccine development,” Alena said.”She’s only been in the lab for a couple of months, and she’s already helping to train incoming students who have completed their undergraduate degree,” Webb said.The diversity in research program is right up Alena’s alley. She started her own foundation, called the Brown STEM Girl Foundation.”We have girls who just want to come together and see other girls of color, just like them, who also want to go into the STEM field, also being able to take them around the world, plan trips so they can go places,” Alena said. “I just want to inspire girls to keep going and follow their dreams.”

A child prodigy is spending her summer researching ovarian cancer at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

It’s not unusual for college students to switch majors, but when it comes to Alena Analeigh, she’s anything but typical.

“At first, I thought I was going to be an engineer because I was in love with NASA, like stars and rovers. But I took my first engineering class and it really didn’t go as planned. So, I switched over to biological sciences,” Alena said.

The 14-year-old rising college senior graduated from high school at the age of 12.

Alena is the youngest research intern in a special internship program designed to increase diversity in the field of biomedicine that is funded by the American Cancer Society. Eight students from colleges in Maryland and across the country were selected to take part in the 11-week program at the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Greenebaum Comprehensive Cancer Center.

“When you see people who look like you in the lab, you feel that you can participate, you feel that you have a place and you can contribute,” said Dr. Tonya Webb, an associate professor and assistant director for diversity, equity and inclusion at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

Alena’s work has focused on ovarian cancer. A student at Arizona State University, she’s considering going to the University of Maryland School of Medicine here for her Ph.D. in viral immunology.

“To study viruses, travel around the world, and hopefully, do some vaccine development,” Alena said.

alena analeigh

“She’s only been in the lab for a couple of months, and she’s already helping to train incoming students who have completed their undergraduate degree,” Webb said.

The diversity in research program is right up Alena’s alley. She started her own foundation, called the Brown STEM Girl Foundation.

“We have girls who just want to come together and see other girls of color, just like them, who also want to go into the STEM field, also being able to take them around the world, plan trips so they can go places,” Alena said. “I just want to inspire girls to keep going and follow their dreams.”

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -
Google search engine

Most Popular

Recent Comments